Treasure Island

John Donne

(24 January 1572 - 31 March 1631 / London, England)

Good Morrow


I wonder, by my truth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved; were we not weaned till then,
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers' den?
'Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, 'twas but a dream of thee.

And now good morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room, an everywhere.
Let sead discoveries to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to others, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess our world; each hath one and is one.

My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp North, without declining West?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one; or thou and I
Love so alike that none do slacken, none can die.

Submitted: Friday, January 03, 2003

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  • Lekë Loshi (12/10/2009 11:41:00 PM)

    Wonderful poem. And by the way, it is not 'by my truth', 'it is by my troth'. (Report) Reply

  • Andrew Hoellering (12/4/2009 3:40:00 AM)

    The Good Morrow is a love poem without parallel.The lovers did not come into their own until they met; now everything in the world is a reflection of their love, which is seen as the only reality. (verse one.)
    Often we fear others; not so the lovers, whose trust in one another is absolute. Life is seen through the prism of their love. Each is self-sufficient as each includes the world of the other, so one little room is capable of becoming an everywhere. (verse two.)
    The image of sea exploration continues into the last stanza, and is used to stress the constancy of the lovers, whose honest and open hearts are reflected in one another’s eyes.
    Donne draws on seventeenth century science and maths to prove that his love for his future wife, and her’s for him, need never die. (Report) Reply

  • Emily Oldham (6/21/2009 5:21:00 AM)

    This poem is probably my favourite of Donne's. Beautiful imagery, beautiful language, beautiful all of it! I love it! (Report) Reply

  • Caelee Laing (2/25/2008 3:31:00 AM)

    Love like has not ever been explained as brilliantly and as simply as it is in this amazing man's poem.. Wonderful tone and perfect metaphorical imagery. A definite favourite of mine. (Report) Reply

  • James Atkinson (2/16/2008 6:40:00 PM)

    It is a remarkable measure how far we have shrunk: our art, our poetry, the blare and discord of our music; all display what we have come to give great praise, our dilapidated education community. (Report) Reply

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