Carl Sandburg

(6 January 1878 – 22 July 1967 / Illinois)

Mamie - Poem by Carl Sandburg

MAMIE beat her head against the bars of a little Indiana
town and dreamed of romance and big things off
somewhere the way the railroad trains all ran.
She could see the smoke of the engines get lost down
where the streaks of steel flashed in the sun and
when the newspapers came in on the morning mail
she knew there was a big Chicago far off, where all
the trains ran.
She got tired of the barber shop boys and the post office
chatter and the church gossip and the old pieces the
band played on the Fourth of July and Decoration Day
And sobbed at her fate and beat her head against the
bars and was going to kill herself
When the thought came to her that if she was going to
die she might as well die struggling for a clutch of
romance among the streets of Chicago.
She has a job now at six dollars a week in the basement
of the Boston Store
And even now she beats her head against the bars in the
same old way and wonders if there is a bigger place
the railroads run to from Chicago where maybe
there is

and big things
and real dreams
that never go smash.

Comments about Mamie by Carl Sandburg

  • Bronze Star - 2,809 Points Anita Sharma (9/21/2015 12:29:00 PM)

    very romantic poem.loved it much (Report) Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
Read all 1 comments »

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Read poems about / on: romance, july, fate, lost, sun, running, shopping, dream

Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003

Poem Edited: Saturday, April 18, 2015

[Hata Bildir]