(400 BC / India)

Mother's Blessings - Poem by Valmiki

Tears of sorrow and of suffering flowed from Queen Kausalya's eye,
As she saw departing Sita for her blessings drawing nigh,

And she clasped the gentle Sits, and she kissed her moistened head,
And her tears like summer tempest choked the loving words she said:

'Part we, dear devoted daughter, to thy husband ever true,
With a woman's whole affection render love to husband's due!

False are women loved and cherished, gentle in their speech and word,
When misfortune's shadows gather, who are faithless to their lord,

Who through years of sunny splendour smile and pass the livelong day,
When misfortune's darkness thickens, from their husband turn away,

Who with changeful fortune changing oft ignore the plighted word,
And forget a woman's duty, woman's faith to wedded lord,

Who to holy love inconstant from their wedded consort part,
Manly deed nor manly virtue wins the changeful woman's heart!

But the true and righteous woman, loving, spouse and changeless wife,
Faithful to her lord and consort holds him dearer than her life,

Ever true and righteous Sita, follow still my godlike son,
Like a God to thee is Rama in the woods or on the throne!'

'I shall do my duty, mother,' said the wife with wifely pride,
'Like a God to me is Rama, Sita shall not leave his side,

From the Moon will part his lustre ere I part from wedded lord,
Ere from faithful wife's devotion falter in my deed or word,

For the stringless lute is silent, idle is the wheel-less car,
And no wife the loveless consort, inauspicious is her star!

Small the measure of affection which the sire and brother prove,
Measureless to wedded woman is her lord and husband's love,

True to Law and true to Scriptures, true to woman's plighted word,
Can I ever be, my mother, faithless, loveless to my lord?'

Tears of joy and mingled sorrow filled the Queen Kausalya's eye,
As she marked the faithful Sita true in heart, in virtue high,

And she wept the tears of sadness when with sweet obeisance due,
Spake with hands in meekness folded Rama ever good and true:

'Sorrow not, my loving mother, trust in virtue's changeless beam,
Swift will fly the years of exile like a brief and transient dream,

Girt by faithful friends and forces, blest by righteous Gods above,
Thou shalt see thy son returning to thy bosom and thy love!

Unto all the royal ladies Rama his obeisance paid,
For his failings unremembered, blessings and forgiveness prayed,

And his words were soft and gentle, and they wept to see him go,
Like the piercing cry of curlew rose the piercing voice of woe,

And in halls where drum and tabor rose in joy and regal pride,
Voice of grief and lamentation sounded far and sounded wide!

Then the true and faithful Lakshman parted from each weeping dame,
And to sorrowing Queen Sumitra with his due obeisance came,

And he bowed to Queen Sumitra and his mother kissed his head,
Stilled her anguish-laden bosom and in trembling accents said:

Dear devoted duteous Lakshman, ever to thy elder true,
When thy elder wends to forest, forest-life to thee is due,

Thou hast served him true and faithful in his glory and his fame,
This is Law for true and righteous,--serve him in his woe and shame,

This is Law for race of Raghu known on earth for holy might,
Bounteous in their sacred duty, brave and warlike in the fight!

Therefore tend him as thy father, as thy mother tend his wife,
And to thee, like fair Ayodhya be thy humble forest life,

Go, my son, the voice of Duty bids my gallant Lakshman go,
Serve thy elder with devotion and with valour meet thy foe

Poet's Notes about The Poem

By Romesh C. Dutt (1899)
DASA-RATHA-VIYOGA (The Death of the King)

Comments about Mother's Blessings by Valmiki

  • (1/23/2016 10:47:00 PM)

    A master piece in Hindu mythology- Epic Ramayana 's extract superbly translated. Thanks for sharing. (Report) Reply

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  • (1/23/2016 9:02:00 PM)

    The family values of Hindus are written in this poem and these values are strictly followed by the staunch Hindu society men are considered as the Heads and one rung above the women, even if they are the young male children. we have never let them to do the following works: cooking, cleaning, babysitting, changing the nappies and other menial works reserved for the women. One more important factor you all must know is, that we call our spouse in plural. For example instead of telling he has come back home, we are telling They have (only one person) come back home..

    Modern and westernized Indian Hindu girls and women are losing their identity, calling their spouses singularly without any respect and force them to do all kinds of work in the name of LOVE and equality..
    (Report) Reply

  • Susan Williams (1/23/2016 2:43:00 PM)

    Valmiki is known as the harbinger-poet in Sanskrit literature. The epic Ramayana is believed to be written by him. He is honored as the First Poet, because he is said to have invented shloka (i.e. first verse or epic metre) , which set the base and defined the form to Sanskrit poetry. (Wikipedia] I know that has little to do with commenting on this poem but I knew nothing about him and hoped to gain insight into his poetry through his life. Will search elsewhere. As far as this poem, there is a firm moral basis for marriage and other human relationships that is very refreshing. (Report) Reply

  • (1/23/2016 9:33:00 AM)

    why we send our sons
    to battle instead our
    daughters to arrange
    peace that would be
    something? ? ?
    (Report) Reply

  • (1/23/2016 9:12:00 AM)

    A great epic story that too on values of life and it is beautifully told in this poem. (Report) Reply

  • B.m. Biswas (1/23/2016 7:00:00 AM)

    it is only mothers love.....on feels during departing...great.. (Report) Reply

  • Edward Kofi Louis (1/23/2016 2:06:00 AM)

    Tears! ! When a mother departs into another world. Nice work. (Report) Reply

  • (7/7/2012 4:41:00 AM)

    a true natation of worldly deeds and loving console of a mother (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Saturday, July 7, 2012

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