Charles Edward Carryl

(30 December 1841 – 3 July 1920 / New York City, New York)

Robinson Crusoe's Story


THE night was thick and hazy
When the 'Piccadilly Daisy'
Carried down the crew and captain in the sea;
And I think the water drowned 'em;
For they never, never found 'em,
And I know they didn't come ashore with me.



Oh! 'twas very sad and lonely
When I found myself the only
Population on this cultivated shore;
But I've made a little tavern
In a rocky little cavern,
And I sit and watch for people at the door.



I spent no time in looking
For a girl to do my cooking,
As I'm quite a clever hand at making stews;
But I had that fellow Friday,
Just to keep the tavern tidy,
And to put a Sunday polish on my shoes.



I have a little garden
That I'm cultivating lard in,
As the things I eat are rather tough and dry;
For I live on toasted lizards,
Prickly pears, and parrot gizzards,
And I'm really very fond of beetle-pie.



The clothes I had were furry,
And it made me fret and worry
When I found the moths were eating off the hair;
And I had to scrape and sand 'em,
And I boiled 'em and I tanned 'em,
Till I got the fine morocco suit I wear.



I sometimes seek diversion
In a family excursion
With the few domestic animals you see;
And we take along a carrot
As refreshment for the parrot,
And a little can of jungleberry tea.



Then we gather as we travel,
Bits of moss and dirty gravel,
And we chip off little specimens of stone;
And we carry home as prizes
Funny bugs, of handy sizes,
Just to give the day a scientific tone.



If the roads are wet and muddy
We remain at home and study,—
For the Goat is very clever at a sum,—
And the Dog, instead of fighting,
Studies ornamental writing,
While the Cat is taking lessons on the drum.



We retire at eleven,
And we rise again at seven;
And I wish to call attention, as I close,
To the fact that all the scholars
Are correct about their collars,
And particular in turning out their toes.

Submitted: Thursday, January 01, 2004

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  • Suparna Koley (8/1/2013 4:32:00 AM)

    To the fact...scholars-he meant the development he had was progressing his knowledge gradually through the hardships and innovative way to overcome it.He has become one of the most important scholars in the island where he was exiled and found out the ways to protect him. I t was his wisdom, the knowledge and the urge to explore more for the crisis moments. But he mentioned all the scholars, that means he wanted to mean those ACCOMPANY proved their intellegence and its practise instead of their blunt animality. They became expert of self development with different skill and activities.

    are correct about their collars-here he wanted to mean the behavior and intelligence are gradually rectified by themselves with a method of try and error.As Crusoe was very close to the animals accompanied him in the island, the collars being the behaviours and module of works were being changed by the situation and conditioned thrusted upon them.Their collars meant the behaviours of animals mentioned in the previous stanza were being unveiled to him.

    and particular turning out their toes- meant The way they wanted to prove his work . He pointed out the activities of scholars and their tool to share time and experience a midst the strong tide of lonely island where each and every corner was unknown to them.. Robinson Crusoe tried to know particular their worthiness of knowledge.

    suparna koley (Report) Reply

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