Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Sonnet On Approaching Italy - Poem by Oscar Wilde

I REACHED the Alps: the soul within me burned
Italia, my Italia, at thy name:
And when from out the mountain's heart I came
And saw the land for which my life had yearned,
I laughed as one who some great prize had earned:
And musing on the story of thy fame
I watched the day, till marked with wounds of flame
The turquoise sky to burnished gold was turned,
The pine-trees waved as waves a woman's hair,
And in the orchards every twining spray
Was breaking into flakes of blossoming foam:
But when I knew that far away at Rome
In evil bonds a second Peter lay,
I wept to see the land so very fair.


Comments about Sonnet On Approaching Italy by Oscar Wilde

  • Fabrizio Frosini Fabrizio Frosini (5/17/2016 11:17:00 AM)

    '' And saw the land for which my life had yearned,
    I laughed as one who some great prize had earned: ''

    expressing beautifully the desire of any great Artist to visit Italy and see its 'past glories' (Report) Reply

    13 person liked.
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Read poems about / on: evil, woman, hair, sky, heart, life, sonnet, tree, women



Poem Submitted: Friday, May 18, 2001

Poem Edited: Friday, May 18, 2001


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