Robert Browning

(1812-1889 / London / England)

The Twins - Poem by Robert Browning

Give'' and ``It-shall-be-given-unto-you.''


Grand rough old Martin Luther
Bloomed fables---flowers on furze,
The better the uncouther:
Do roses stick like burrs?


A beggar asked an alms
One day at an abbey-door,
Said Luther; but, seized with qualms,
The abbot replied, ``We're poor!


``Poor, who had plenty once,
``When gifts fell thick as rain:
``But they give us nought, for the nonce,
``And how should we give again?''


Then the beggar, ``See your sins!
``Of old, unless I err,
``Ye had brothers for inmates, twins,
``Date and Dabitur.


``While Date was in good case
``Dabitur flourished too:
``For Dabitur's lenten face
``No wonder if Date rue.


``Would ye retrieve the one?
``Try and make plump the other!
``When Date's penance is done,
``Dabitur helps his brother.


``Only, beware relapse!''
The Abbot hung his head.
This beggar might be perhaps
An angel, Luther said.

Comments about The Twins by Robert Browning

  • Edward Kofi Louis (4/30/2016 1:42:00 PM)

    Unless i err! ! Nice piece of work. (Report) Reply

    0 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • Gajanan Mishra (4/30/2016 8:41:00 AM)

    good one, see your sins.. (Report) Reply

  • (4/30/2016 5:12:00 AM)

    Awesome twins and equally awesome is their philosophy narrated in this great poem. Thanks for sharing it here. (Report) Reply

  • Amiegbereta Edwin (4/30/2016 5:10:00 AM)

    Nice piece...thanks for sharing (Report) Reply

Read all 4 comments »

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Read poems about / on: angel, brother, rain, rose, flower

Poem Submitted: Sunday, May 13, 2001

Poem Edited: Sunday, May 13, 2001

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