Katherine Mansfield

(14 October 1888 – 9 January 1923 / Wellington)

To L. H. B. (1894-1915 ) - Poem by Katherine Mansfield

Last night for the first time since you were dead
I walked with you, my brother, in a dream.
We were at home again beside the stream
Fringed with tall berry bushes, white and red.
"Don't touch them: they are poisonous," I said.
But your hand hovered, and I saw a beam
Of strange, bright laughter flying round your head
And as you stooped I saw the berries gleam.
"Don't you remember? We called them Dead Man's
I woke and heard the wind moan and the roar
Of the dark water tumbling on the shore.
Where--where is the path of my dream for my eager
By the remembered stream my brother stands
Waiting for me with berries in his hands...
"These are my body. Sister, take and eat."

Comments about To L. H. B. (1894-1915 ) by Katherine Mansfield

  • Rookie Kazza Clark (10/20/2010 1:05:00 AM)

    The last few lines of this poem completely warped my understanding of it. What does it mean? (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: brother, sister, laughter, dream, remember, red, water, home, wind, dark, night, time

Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002

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