Edwin Arlington Robinson

(22 December 1869 – 6 April 1935 / Maine / United States)

Verlaine - Poem by Edwin Arlington Robinson

Why do you dig like long-clawed scavengers
To touch the covered corpse of him that fled
The uplands for the fens, and rioted
Like a sick satyr with doom’s worshippers?
Come! let the grass grow there; and leave his verse
To tell the story of the life he led.
Let the man go: let the dead flesh be dead,
And let the worms be its biographers.

Song sloughs away the sin to find redress
In art’s complete remembrance: nothing clings
For long but laurel to the stricken brow
That felt the Muse’s finger; nothing less
Than hell’s fulfilment of the end of things
Can blot the star that shines on Paris now.

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Read poems about / on: paris, sick, star, song, life

Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003

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