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(1850-1894 / Edinburgh / Scotland)

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From a Railway Carriage

Faster than fairies, faster than witches,
Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches;
And charging along like troops in a battle
All through the meadows the horses and cattle:
All of the sights of the hill and the plain
Fly as thick as driving rain;
And ever again, in the wink of an eye,
Painted stations whistle by.
Here is a child who clambers and scrambles,
All by himself and gathering brambles;
Here is a tramp who stands and gazes;
And here is the green for stringing the daisies!
Here is a cart runaway in the road
Lumping along with man and load;
And here is a mill, and there is a river:
Each a glimpse and gone forever!

Submitted: Friday, January 03, 2003


Read poems about / on: river, rain, child, green, horse, house, fairy, children

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Comments about this poem (Air Of Diabelli's by Robert Louis Stevenson )

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  • Thomas Vaughan Jones (2/24/2014 2:14:00 PM)

    Grab a ticket and enjoy the ride. This is onomatopoeia at it's best. Listen to the music of the poem, the rhythm of the wheels, sway with the movement of the carriage, and simply enjoy the view. Intellectuals would no doubt dissect this piece and discuss the transition of time and the fleeting existence of we mere mortals. I prefer to enjoy the sheer exhuberance of the poem

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  • Sarah Kirk (12/15/2009 8:32:00 AM)

    One of my favourites along with 'Night Mail'. The rhythm really reflects the sound of the steam train and views from the window seen on frequent childhood journesy by steam train.

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