Anne Brontë

(7 January 1820 – 28 May 1849 / Thornton, West Riding of Yorkshire, England)

Anne Brontë Poems

1. Vanitas Vanitatis, Etc. 12/31/2002
2. Verses By Lady Geralda 12/31/2002
3. To Cowper 12/31/2002
4. Vanitas Vanitatum, Omnia Vanitas 12/31/2002
5. The Three Guides 12/31/2002
6. To -------- 12/31/2002
7. The North Wind 12/31/2002
8. Stanzas 12/31/2002
9. Song 2 12/31/2002
10. Z---------'s Dream 12/31/2002
11. The Penitent 12/31/2002
12. Mirth And Mourning 12/31/2002
13. Lines Written At Thorp Green 12/31/2002
14. The Parting (2) 12/31/2002
15. Weep Not Too Much 12/31/2002
16. Parting Address From Z.Z. To A.E. 12/31/2002
17. Views Of Life 12/31/2002
18. The Student's Serenade 12/31/2002
19. Severed And Gone 12/31/2002
20. Lines Inscribed On The Wall Of A Dungeon In The Southern P Of I 12/31/2002
21. Song 12/31/2002
22. Yes Thou Art Gone 12/31/2002
23. Lines Written From Home 12/31/2002
24. My God! O Let Me Call Thee Mine! 12/31/2002
25. Self Communion 12/31/2002
26. Last Lines 12/31/2002
27. Memory 12/31/2002
28. Power Of Love 12/31/2002
29. Music On Christmas Morning 12/31/2002
30. The Arbour 12/31/2002
31. The Narrow Way 12/31/2002
32. Fragment 12/31/2002
33. Self-Congratulation 12/31/2002
34. Fluctuations 12/31/2002
35. The Parting 12/31/2002
36. A Word To The Calvinists 12/31/2002
37. Past Days 12/31/2002
38. A Word To The 'Elect' 12/31/2002
39. Night 12/31/2002
40. An Orphan's Lament 12/31/2002
Best Poem of Anne Brontë

Dreams

While on my lonely couch I lie,
I seldom feel myself alone,
For fancy fills my dreaming eye
With scenes and pleasures of its own.
Then I may cherish at my breast
An infant's form beloved and fair,
May smile and soothe it into rest
With all a Mother's fondest care.

How sweet to feel its helpless form
Depending thus on me alone!
And while I hold it safe and warm
What bliss to think it is my own!

And glances then may meet my eyes
That daylight never showed to me;
What raptures in my bosom rise,
Those earnest looks of love to see, ...

Read the full of Dreams

A Hymn

Eternal power of earth and air,
Unseen, yet seen in all around,
Remote, but dwelling everywhere,
Though silent, heard in every sound.
If e'er thine ear in mercy bent
When wretched mortals cried to thee,
And if indeed thy Son was sent
To save lost sinners such as me.

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