Henry Timrod

(8 December 1828 - 7 October 1867 / Charleston, South Carolina)

Henry Timrod Poems

81. The Two Armies 1/1/2004
82. A Year's Courtship 1/1/2004
83. Charleston 1/1/2004
84. Our Willie 1/1/2004
85. The Unknown Dead 1/1/2004
86. Carolina 1/1/2004
87. A Common Thought 1/1/2004
88. A Cry To Arms 1/1/2004
89. Youth And Manhood 1/1/2004
90. Retirement 1/1/2004
91. A Rhapsody Of A Southern Winter Night 1/1/2004
92. An Exotic 1/1/2004
93. A Mother Gazes Upon Her Daughter 1/1/2004
94. Baby's Age 1/1/2004

Comments about Henry Timrod

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  • Fabrizio Frosini Fabrizio Frosini (10/14/2015 1:30:00 PM)

    '' Timrod is, after Poe, the most important Southern poet of the nineteenth century. The quality of his best work, though small in bulk, exceeds that of Sidney Lanier and Hayne, and his contributions to war and nature poetry also exceed theirs. He is not a major poet, but he is a significant minor poet. ''
    [Rayburn S. Moore, University of Georgia]

Best Poem of Henry Timrod

Baby's Age

She came with April blooms and showers;
We count her little life by flowers.
As buds the rose upon her cheek,
We choose a flower for every week.
A week of hyacinths, we say,
And one of heart's-ease, ushered May;
And then because two wishes met
Upon the rose and violet --
I liked the Beauty, Kate, the Nun --
The violet and the rose count one.
A week the apple marked with white;
A week the lily scored in light;
Red poppies closed May's happy moon,
And tulips this blue week in June.
Here end as yet the flowery links;
To-day begins the week of ...

Read the full of Baby's Age

Sonnet 03

Life ever seems as from its present site
It aimed to lure us. Mountains of the past
It melts, with all their crags and caverns vast,
Into a purple cloud! Across the night
Which hides what is to be, it shoots a light
All rosy with the yet unrisen dawn.
Not the near daisies, but yon distant height
Attracts us, lying on this emerald lawn.
And always, be the landscape what it may --

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