poet William Matthews

William Matthews

A Poetry Reading At West Point

I read to the entire plebe class,
in two batches. Twice the hall filled
with bodies dressed alike, each toting
a copy of my book. What would my
shrink say, if I had one, about
such a dream, if it were a dream?

Question and answer time.
"Sir," a cadet yelled from the balcony,
and gave his name and rank, and then,
closing his parentheses, yelled
"Sir" again. "Why do your poems give
me a headache when I try

to understand them?" he asked. "Do
you want that?" I have a gift for
gentle jokes to defuse tension,
but this was not the time to use it.
"I try to write as well as I can
what it feels like to be human,"

I started, picking my way care-
fully, for he and I were, after
all, pained by the same dumb longings.
"I try to say what I don't know
how to say, but of course I can't
get much of it down at all."

By now I was sweating bullets.
"I don't want my poems to be hard,
unless the truth is, if there is
a truth." Silence hung in the hall
like a heavy fabric. My own
head ached. "Sir," he yelled. "Thank you. Sir."


Anonymous submission.

Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003

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Comments about A Poetry Reading At West Point by William Matthews

  • Denny (5/18/2018 10:33:00 AM)

    Just because a story is arranged in broken lines doesn't make it poetry.

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  • Douglas Scotney (3/21/2015 8:36:00 PM)

    The one truth has to be hard.

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Read poems about / on: truth, dream, silence, poetry, time, thanks, poem