William Butler Yeats

(13 June 1865 – 28 January 1939 / County Dublin / Ireland)

An Appointment - Poem by William Butler Yeats

BEING out of heart with government
I took a broken root to fling
Where the proud, wayward squirrel went,
Taking delight that he could spring;
And he, with that low whinnying sound
That is like laughter, sprang again
And so to the other tree at a bound.
Nor the tame will, nor timid brain,
Nor heavy knitting of the brow
Bred that fierce tooth and cleanly limb
And threw him up to laugh on the bough;
No govermnent appointed him.


Comments about An Appointment by William Butler Yeats

  • (12/19/2009 4:47:00 AM)


    This is Yeats disillusioned with his role in politics.
    He admires the 'proud and wayward squirrel, ' in every way the opposite of the politicians with whom he deals, with their 'tame will' and 'timid brains.'
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Read poems about / on: laughter, spring, tree, heart



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, May 15, 2001

Poem Edited: Tuesday, May 15, 2001


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