Robert Graves

(1895 - 1985 / London / England)

An English Wood - Poem by Robert Graves

This valley wood is pledged
To the set shape of things,
And reasonably hedged:
Here are no harpies fledged,
No rocs may clap their wings,
Nor gryphons wave their stings.
Here, poised in quietude,
Calm elementals brood
On the set shape of things:
They fend away alarms
From this green wood.
Here nothing is that harms -
No bulls with lungs of brass,
No toothed or spiny grass,
No tree whose clutching arms
Drink blood when travellers pass,
No mount of glass;
No bardic tongues unfold
Satires or charms.
Only, the lawns are soft,
The tree-stems, grave and old;
Slow branches sway aloft,
The evening air comes cold,
The sunset scatters gold.
Small grasses toss and bend,
Small pathways idly tend
Towards no fearful end.


Comments about An English Wood by Robert Graves

  • (1/19/2012 2:30:00 PM)


    Brilliant poem. Alan Bennett said, with a poem you can do more with less (words): this poem illustrates the point exactly. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: sunset, tree, green



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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