Edwin Arlington Robinson

(22 December 1869 – 6 April 1935 / Maine / United States)

Lingard And The Stars - Poem by Edwin Arlington Robinson

The table hurled itself, to our surprise,
At Lingard, and anon rapped eagerly:
“When earth is cold and there is no more sea,
There will be what was Lingard. Otherwise,
Why lure the race to ruin through the skies?
And why have Leffingwell, or Calverly?”—
“I wish the ghost would give his name,” said he;
And searching gratitude was in his eyes.

He stood then by the window for a time,
And only after the last midnight chime
Smote the day dead did he say anything:
“Come out, my little one, the stars are bright;
Come out, you lælaps, and inhale the night.”
And so he went away with Clavering.


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Read poems about / on: sea, night, time, sky, star



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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