Edwin Arlington Robinson

(22 December 1869 – 6 April 1935 / Maine / United States)

The Dead Village - Poem by Edwin Arlington Robinson

Here there is death. But even here, they say,
Here where the dull sun shines this afternoon
As desolate as ever the dead moon
Did glimmer on dead Sardis, men were gay;
And there were little children here to play,
With small soft hands that once did keep in tune
The strings that stretch from heaven, till too soon
The change came, and the music passed away.

Now there is nothing but the ghosts of things,—
No life, no love, no children, and no men;
And over the forgotten place there clings
The strange and unrememberable light
That is in dreams. The music failed, and then
God frowned, and shut the village from His sight.


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Read poems about / on: music, children, change, moon, heaven, death, sun, light, god, life, child, dream



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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