William Henry Davies

(3 July 1871 – 26 September 1940 / Monmouthshire / Wales)

The Mind's Liberty - Poem by William Henry Davies

The mind, with its own eyes and ears,
May for these others have no care;
No matter where this body is,
The mind is free to go elsewhere.
My mind can be a sailor, when
This body's still confined to land;
And turn these mortals into trees,
That walk in Fleet Street or the Strand.

So, when I'm passing Charing Cross,
Where porters work both night and day,
I ofttimes hear sweet Malpas Brook,
That flows thrice fifty miles away.
And when I'm passing near St Paul's
I see beyond the dome and crowd,
Twm Barlum, that green pap in Gwent,
With its dark nipple in a cloud.


Comments about The Mind's Liberty by William Henry Davies

  • Robert Murray Smith (6/22/2016 6:40:00 PM)


    I enjoyed the thoughts you conveyed of freedom. Stephen Hawking's mind is the best example of this.

    A very good write.

    You might like to read my poem The Mind.
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  • (3/21/2006 2:50:00 PM)


    The art of being elsewhere. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: work, green, dark, night, tree



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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