William Henry Davies

(3 July 1871 – 26 September 1940 / Monmouthshire / Wales)

The Sluggard - Poem by William Henry Davies

A jar of cider and my pipe,
In summer, under shady tree;
A book by one that made his mind
Live by its sweet simplicity:
Then must I laugh at kings who sit
In richest chambers, signing scrolls;
And princes cheered in public ways,
And stared at by a thousand fools.

Let me be free to wear my dreams,
Like weeds in some mad maiden's hair,
When she believes the earth has not
Another maid so rich and fair;
And proudly smiles on rich and poor,
The queen of all fair women then:
So I, dressen in my idle dreams,
Will think myself the king of men.


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Read poems about / on: women, summer, tree, hair, believe, dream, woman, smile



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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