Edwin Arlington Robinson

(22 December 1869 – 6 April 1935 / Maine / United States)

The Tree In Pamela's Garden - Poem by Edwin Arlington Robinson

Pamela was too gentle to deceive
Her roses. “Let the men stay where they are,”
She said, “and if Apollo’s avatar
Be one of them, I shall not have to grieve.”
And so she made all Tilbury Town believe
She sighed a little more for the North Star
Than over men, and only in so far
As she was in a garden was like Eve.

Her neighbors—doing all that neighbors can
To make romance of reticence meanwhile—
Seeing that she had never loved a man,
Wished Pamela had a cat, or a small bird,
And only would have wondered at her smile
Could they have seen that she had overheard.


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Read poems about / on: romance, cat, believe, star, smile, tree, rose



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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