To Fame

I

Right Fairy of the morn, with flowers arrayed,
Whose beauties to thy young pursuer seem
Beyond the ecstasy of poet's dream—
Shall I overtake thee, ere thy lustre fade?

II

Ripe glory of the noon, august, and proud,
A vision of high purpose, power, and skill,
That melteth into mirage of good-will—
Do I o'ertake thee, or embrace a cloud?

III

Gray shadow of the evening, gaunt and bare,
At random cast, beyond me or above,
And cold as memory in the arms of love—
If I o'ertook thee now, what should I care?

IV

'No morn, or noon, or eve am I,' she said;
'But night—the depth of night behind the sun;
By all mankind pursued; but never won,
Until my shadow falls upon a shade.'

READ THIS POEM IN OTHER LANGUAGES
COMMENTS OF THE POEM