Algernon Charles Swinburne

(5 April 1837 - 10 April 1909 / London)

Algernon Charles Swinburne Poems

201. Itylus 1/3/2003
202. Hymn Of Man 1/1/2004
203. A Clasp Of Hands 12/31/2002
204. Time And Life 1/1/2004
205. Wasted Love 1/1/2004
206. Music: An Ode 12/31/2002
207. Prelude - Tristan And Isolde 1/1/2004
208. Four Songs Of Four Seasons 12/31/2002
209. A Night-Piece By Millet 1/1/2004
210. A Flower-Piece By Fantin 1/1/2004
211. Hymn To Proserpine (After The Proclamation Of The Christian 1/1/2004
212. Birth And Death 1/1/2004
213. A Ballad Of Burdens 12/31/2002
214. A Dead Friend 1/1/2004
215. Love And Sleep 12/31/2002
216. A Child's Laughter 12/31/2002
217. A Leave-Taking 12/31/2002
218. The Garden Of Prosperine 1/3/2003
219. A Match 1/3/2003
220. A Baby's Death 1/1/2004
221. A Forsaken Garden 12/31/2002
222. Love Lies Bleeding 1/1/2004
223. A Ballad Of Death 1/3/2003
224. A Ballad Of Dreamland 1/3/2003

Comments about Algernon Charles Swinburne

  • Jamie Mitchell (1/11/2018 11:56:00 AM)

    Didn't Swinburne write a poem about Oacar Wilde? This collection seems incomplete.

    2 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • Johnny Ringo (12/26/2013 11:43:00 PM)

    I love reading Swinburne, some of his works really speak to me and I can read them again and again.

    9 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • Dianne Ross (1/22/2013 3:01:00 AM)

    No poet writes more exquisitely of love than dear Swinburne. I will always hold him close to my heart. He was devoted to his Queen.

    11 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
Best Poem of Algernon Charles Swinburne

A Ballad Of Death

Kneel down, fair Love, and fill thyself with tears,
Girdle thyself with sighing for a girth
Upon the sides of mirth,
Cover thy lips and eyelids, let thine ears
Be filled with rumour of people sorrowing;
Make thee soft raiment out of woven sighs
Upon the flesh to cleave,
Set pains therein and many a grievous thing,
And many sorrows after each his wise
For armlet and for gorget and for sleeve.

O Love's lute heard about the lands of death,
Left hanged upon the trees that were therein;
O Love and Time and Sin,
Three singing mouths that mourn now ...

Read the full of A Ballad Of Death

The Way Of The Wind

The wind's way in the deep sky's hollow
None may measure, as none can say
How the heart in her shows the swallow
The wind's way.

Hope nor fear can avail to stay
Waves that whiten on wrecks that wallow,
Times and seasons that wane and slay.

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