Campbell McGrath

(1962 - / Chicago, Illinois)

Campbell McGrath Poems

1. Dawn 10/11/2017
2. Nox Borealis 10/11/2017
3. Releasing the Sherpas 10/11/2017
4. The Everglades 10/11/2017
5. My Sadness 10/11/2017
6. Charlie Parker (1950) 10/11/2017
7. VILLANELLE 10/11/2017
8. LATE SPRING 10/11/2017
9. Pentatina for Five Vowels 10/11/2017
10. EMILY AND WALT 10/11/2017
11. Joseph Brodsky In Venice (1981) 3/5/2014
12. Shopping For Pomegranates At Wal-Mart On New Year's Day 3/9/2012
13. The Human Heart 3/9/2012
14. The Prose Poem 12/13/2011
15. Nights On Planet Earth 12/13/2011
16. An Irish Word 12/13/2011
17. Hemingway Dines On Boiled Shrimp And Beer 1/20/2003

Comments about Campbell McGrath

  • Barry Bloomberg (1/10/2013 12:53:00 AM)

    Campbell, you have a keen, deep sense of the world; I love your imagery and interwoven flow of wit, irony, and delight in your subjects. Timeless stuff. Do you have more?

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  • Barry Bloomberg (1/10/2013 12:51:00 AM)

    Campbell, you have a keen, deep sense of the world; I love your imagery and interwoven flow of wit, irony, and delight in your subjects. Timeless stuff. Do you have more?

Best Poem of Campbell McGrath

Hemingway Dines On Boiled Shrimp And Beer

I'm the original two-hearted brawler.
I gnaw the scrawny heads from prawns,
pummel those mute, translucent crustaceans,
wingless hummingbirds, salt-water spawned.
As the Catalonians do, I eat the eyes at once.
My brawny palms flatten their mainstays.
I pop the shells with my thumbs, then crunch.

Just watch me as I swagger and sprawl,
spice-mad and sated, then dabble in lager
before I go strolling for stronger waters
down to Sloppy Joe's.My stride as I stagger
shivers the islands, my fingers troll a thousand keys.
My appetite shakes the rock of the ...

Read the full of Hemingway Dines On Boiled Shrimp And Beer

An Irish Word

Canny has always been an Irish word
to my ear, so too its cousin crafty,
suggesting not only an appreciation of close-work,
fine-making, handwrought artistry,

but a highly evolved reliance on one’s wits to survive,
stealth in the shadow of repressive institutions,
“silence, exile, and cunning,” in Joyce’s admonition,
ferret-sly, fox-quick, silvery, and elusive.

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