Christina Georgina Rossetti

[Christina Rossetti] (5 December 1830 – 29 December 1894 / London)

Christina Georgina Rossetti Poems

81. An October Garden 4/1/2010
82. Bird Raptures 4/1/2010
83. I Have But One Rose In The World 4/1/2010
84. O Wind, Where Have You Been 4/1/2010
85. A Ring Upon Her Finger 4/1/2010
86. Maiden May 4/1/2010
87. My Friend 4/1/2010
88. Hope Is Like A Harebell Trembling From Its Birth 4/1/2010
89. Our Little Baby Fell Asleep 4/1/2010
90. Mother Country 4/1/2010
91. Margaret Has A Milking-Pail 4/1/2010
92. Where Innocent Bright-Eyed Daisies Are 4/1/2010
93. Bread And Milk For Breakfast 4/1/2010
94. L. E. L. 4/1/2010
95. Clever Little Willie Wee 4/1/2010
96. The First Spring Day 4/1/2010
97. O Sailor, Come Ashore 4/1/2010
98. Advent 4/1/2010
99. If A Pig Wore A Wig 4/1/2010
100. One Sea-Side Grave 4/1/2010
101. Blind From My Birth 4/1/2010
102. All The Bells Were Ringing 4/1/2010
103. The Dear Old Woman In The Lane 4/1/2010
104. From House To House 4/1/2010
105. The Ghost’s Petition 4/1/2010
106. Jesus, Do I Love Thee? 4/1/2010
107. Ding A Ding 4/1/2010
108. Lord Jesus, Who Would Think That I Am Thine? 4/1/2010
109. Song V 4/1/2010
110. Lady Maggie 4/1/2010
111. Growing In The Vale 4/1/2010
112. Currants On A Bush 4/1/2010
113. Wrens And Robins In The Hedge 4/1/2010
114. The Horses Of The Sea 4/1/2010
115. Amor Mundi 4/1/2010
116. Motherless Baby And Babyless Mother 4/1/2010
117. Symbols 4/1/2010
118. Long Barren 4/1/2010
119. Playing At Bob Cherry 4/1/2010
120. Song Iii 4/1/2010
Best Poem of Christina Georgina Rossetti

Remember

Remember me when I am gone away,
Gone far away into the silent land;
When you can no more hold me by the hand,
Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay.
Remember me when no more day by day
You tell me of our future that you plann'd:
Only remember me; you understand
It will be late to counsel then or pray.
Yet if you should forget me for a while
And afterwards remember, do not grieve:
For if the darkness and corruption leave
A vestige of the thoughts that once I had,
Better by far ...

Read the full of Remember

Sappho

I sigh at day-dawn, and I sigh
When the dull day is passing by.
I sigh at evening, and again
I sigh when night brings sleep to men.
Oh! it were far better to die
Than thus forever mourn and sigh,
And in death's dreamless sleep to be
Unconscious that none weep for me;
Eased from my weight of heaviness,

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