Margaret Elizabeth Sangster

Rating: 4.33
Rating: 4.33

Margaret Elizabeth Sangster Biography

Margaret Elizabeth Sangster (1838-1912) was an American poet, author, and editor. She was popular in the late 19th and early 20th century.

Childhood

Sangster was the daughter of John Munson of Ireland and Margaret Chisholm of New York. Her father was in the marble industry in New York City. Margaret and her younger sister Isabell grew up in a very religious household and the two sisters were well educated.

Career

Sangster eventually became an editor at Harper’s Bazaar. Through her work she became acquainted with notable people of her age, including Mark Twain and Helen Keller. Other than Harper’s Bazaar, she contributed to Ladies' Home Journal, Hearth and Home, and the Christian Intelligencer.

Sangster wrote numerous novels and collections of poetry, all deeply infused with religious overtones and references.

Personal life

Sangster spent most of her life in New York and New Jersey. She married George Sangster in 1858 and essentially gave up writing until after his death in 1871. She never remarried and she died in 1912. Her nephew, Charles Chisholm Brainerd, was married to the author Eleanor Hoyt Brainerd.

The Best Poem Of Margaret Elizabeth Sangster

The Sin Of Omission

It isn't the thing you do, dear,
It's the thing you leave undone
That gives you a bit of a heartache
At setting of the sun.
The tender work forgotten,
The letter you did not write,
The flowers you did not send, dear,
Are your haunting ghosts at night.

The stone you might have lifted
Out of a brother's way;
The bit of heartsome counsel
You were hurried too much to say;
The loving touch of the hand, dear,
The gentle, winning tone
Which you had no time nor thought for
With troubles enough of your own.

Those little acts of kindness
So easily out of mind,
Those chances to be angels
Which we poor mortals find -
They come in night and silence,
Each sad, reproachful wraith,
When hope is faint and flagging,
And a chill has fallen on faith.

For life is all too short, dear,
And sorrow is all to great,
To suffer our slow compassion
That tarries until too late:
And it isn't the thing you do, dear,
It's the thing you leave undone
Which gives you a bit of heartache
At the setting of the sun.

Margaret Elizabeth Sangster Comments

LUVmylipgloss 10 May 2018

YOUR FOXNEWS

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FOXNEWS 10 May 2018

WOW THATS NEWS HERE WE COME

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