Mary Hannay Foott

Mary Hannay Foott Poems

A bridle-path in the tangled mallee,
With blossoms unnamed and unknown bespread,
And two who ride through its leafy alley,
But never the sound of a horse's tread.
...

The rushes are black by the river bed,
And the sheep and the cattle stand
Wistful-eyed, where the waters were,
In a waste of gravel and sand;
...

A fringe of rushes -- one green line
   Upon a faded plain;
A silver streak of water-shine --
   Above, tree-watchers twain.
...

Conde had come with us all the way --
   Eight hundred miles -- but the fortnight's rest
Made him fresh as a youngster, the sturdy bay!
   And Lurline was looking her very best.
...

She heard the story of the end,
   Each message, too, she heard;
And there was one for every friend;
   For her alone -- no word.
...

A fringe of rushes, one green line
Upon a faded plain;
A silver streak of water-shine,
Above, tree-watchers twain.
...

On the snow-line of the summit stood the Spaniard's English slave;
And the frighted condor westward flew afar---
Where the torch of Cotopaxi lit the wide Pacific wave,
And the tender moon embraced a new-born star.
...

'Twas brave De Quiros bent the knee before the King of Spain,
And “sire,” he said, “I bring thy ships in safety home again
...

With supple boughs and new-born leaflets crowned,
Rejoicing in fresh verdure stands the tree,
Though weather-scarred and scooped by fire may be
Its ancient trunk. So may our lives be found
...

A little way farther to guide thee I go
Where the footing is firm and the waters are low;
Then we part, O my King, thou once more to thy throne,
I to dwell, in the house of my fathers, alone.
...

A blue line to the westward that surely is not cloud;
A green tinge in the waters; a clamorous bird-crowd;
Then far-off foamy edges, and hill-tops timber fringed;
...

Sing us the Land of the Southern Sea,
The land we have called our own;
Tell us what harvest there shall be
From the seed that we have sown.
...

The sunlight from the sky is swept,
But, over Snowdon's summit kept,
One brand of cloud yet burns,
...

Argument.

I. - The House being ready, Victoria prepares to receive the nations whom she has invited.
...

I. Thanksgiving.

Star, on thy Heaven-returning way,
Our message of thanksgiving bear;
To Him who answered with thy ray
...

And the birds of the air have nests.”

Belated swallow, whither flying?
The day is dead, the light is dying,
...

She heard the story of the end,
Each message, too, she heard;
And there was one for every friend;
For her alone, no word.
...

O happy day, with seven-fold blessings set
Amid thy hallowed hours, the memories dear
Of childhood's holidays, and household cheer,
When friends and kin in loving circle met,
...

A radiance in the midnight sky
No white moon gave, nor yellow star;
We thought its red glow mounted high
Where fire and forest fought afar,
...

His silent spirit from the place
Slid forth unseen; amid the throng
Of those whose love outlived disgrace,
Whose fealty to the last was strong.
...

Mary Hannay Foott Biography

Mary was born in Glasgow on 26th September, 1846. she was the daughter of James Black a leader in the Prebyterian Church. Her Mother descended from the literary family of Hannay. Mary arrived in Australia, 1853and was educated in Melbourne. She married Thomas Wade Foott in 1874, moving to live at Dundoo, Queensland. After the death of her husband in 1884, she was to become the Literary Editor of `The Queenslander' for ten years. She lived and taught at school in Rocklea, a Brisbane suburb in South East Queensland. `Where the Pelican Builds, and other Poems' (Brisbane, 1885). `Morna Lee, and other Poems' (London, 1890). Photograph is of a Fishing party at a Corinda house on Oxley Creek Brisbane in 1897. This large block of land, owned by her father was later donated to the Presbyterian Church where a Nursing Home had been in practice for 75 Years.)

The Best Poem Of Mary Hannay Foott

In The Land Of Dreams

A bridle-path in the tangled mallee,
With blossoms unnamed and unknown bespread,
And two who ride through its leafy alley,
But never the sound of a horse's tread.

And one by one whilst the foremost rider
Puts back the boughs which have grown apace,
And side by side where the track is wider,
Together they come to the olden place.

To the leaf-dyed pool whence the mallards flattered,
Or ever the horses had paused to drink;
Where the word was said and the vow was uttered
That brighten for ever its weedy brink.

And Memory closes her sad recital,
In Fate's cold eyes there are kindly gleams,
While for one brief moment of blest requital,
The parted have met, in the Land of Dreams.

Mary Hannay Foott Comments

ANGRY 11 December 2021

Why can't you give summary. ??

0 0 Reply

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