Philip James Bailey

(1816-1902 / England)

Philip James Bailey Poems

1. Festus - Xiii 9/15/2010
2. Festus - Xiv 9/15/2010
3. Festus - Xix 9/15/2010
4. Festus - Xl 9/15/2010
5. Festus - Xli 9/15/2010
6. Festus - Xlii 9/15/2010
7. Festus - Xliii 9/15/2010
8. Festus - Xliv 9/15/2010
9. Festus - Xlv 9/15/2010
10. Festus - Xv 9/15/2010
11. Festus - Xvi 9/15/2010
12. Festus - Xvii 9/15/2010
13. Festus - Xviii 9/15/2010
14. Festus - Xx 9/15/2010
15. Festus - Xxi 9/15/2010
16. Festus - Xxii 9/16/2010
17. Festus - Xxiii 9/16/2010
18. Festus - Xxiv 9/16/2010
19. Festus - Xxix 9/16/2010
20. Festus - Xxv 9/16/2010
21. Festus - Xxvi 9/16/2010
22. Festus - Xxvii 9/16/2010
23. Festus - Xxviii 9/16/2010
24. Festus - Xxxi 9/16/2010
25. Festus - Xxxii 9/16/2010
26. Festus - Xxxiii 9/16/2010
27. Festus - Xxxiv 9/16/2010
28. Festus - Xxxix 9/16/2010
29. Festus - Xxxv 9/16/2010
30. Festus - Xxxvi 9/16/2010
31. Festus - Xxxvii 9/16/2010
32. Festus - Xxxviii 9/16/2010
33. Festus - Dedication 9/16/2010
34. Festus - L’envoi 9/16/2010
35. Festus - Proem 9/16/2010
36. Fetus - Xi 9/16/2010
37. Hymn 9/16/2010
38. Hymn Of Thanks 9/16/2010
39. A Fragment (I) 9/15/2010
40. A Fragment (Ii) 9/15/2010

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Best Poem of Philip James Bailey

We Live In Deeds . . .

WE live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths;
In feelings, not in figures on a dial.
We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives
Who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best.
And he whose heart beats quickest lives the longest:
Lives in one hour more than in years do some
Whose fat blood sleeps as it slips along their veins.
Life's but a means unto an end; that end,
Beginning, mean, and end to all things - God.
The dead have all the glory of the world.

Read the full of We Live In Deeds . . .

A Fragment (I)

And Zetland where, betimes, some ruthless wight
Scaling the scaur, in sport the nests despoils
Of auk or gull; they, crowding clamorous round,
Intruded on, insulted, injured, sore
Besiege his ears, until with querulous wing,
One stern and ancient fowl assails his eyes;
His hold gives way; he topples headlong down,
From crag to crag rebounding, till the sea,
For many a ghastly loan responsible,

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