Edith Nesbit

(15 August 1858 – 4 May 1924 / Kennington / Surrey / England)

A Tragedy - Poem by Edith Nesbit

Among his books he sits all day
To think and read and write;
He does not smell the new-mown hay,
The roses red and white.

I walk among them all alone,
His silly, stupid wife;
The world seems tasteless, dead and done -
An empty thing is life.

At night his window casts a square
Of light upon the lawn;
I sometimes walk and watch it there
Until the chill of dawn.

I have no brain to understand
The books he loves to read;
I only have a heart and hand
He does not seem to need.

He calls me "Child" - lays on my hair
Thin fingers, cold and mild;
Oh! God of Love, who answers prayer,
I wish I were a child!

And no one sees and no one knows
(He least would know or see),
That ere Love gathers next year's rose
Death will have gathered me.


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Read poems about / on: child, sometimes, rose, hair, red, alone, death, light, god, world, night, love, heart, life, children



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002



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