Franklin Pierce Adams

(15 November 1881 – 23 March 1960 / Chicago, Illinois)

Again Endorsing The Lady - Poem by Franklin Pierce Adams

Horace: Book II, Elegy 2

"Liber eram et vacuo meditabar vivere lecto--"


I was free. I thought that I had entered
Love's Antarctic Zone.
"A truce to sentiment," I said. "My nights
shall be my own."
But Love had double-crossed me. How can
Beauty be so fair?
The grace of her, the face of her--and oh,
her yellow hair!

And oh, the wondrous walk of her! So doth
a goddess glide.
Jove's sister--ay, or Pallas--hath no statelier
a stride.
Fair as Iscomache herself, the Lapithanian
maid;
Or Brimo where at Mercury's side her virgin
form she laid.

Surrender now, ye goddesses whom erst the
shepherd spied!
Upon the heights of Ida lay your vestitures
aside!
And though she reach the countless years of
the Cumæan Sibyl,
May never, never Age at those delightful
features nibble!


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Read poems about / on: elegy, sister, hair, beauty, love



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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