Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

Delight Is As The Flight - Poem by Emily Dickinson

257

Delight is as the flight—
Or in the Ratio of it,
As the Schools would say—
The Rainbow's way—
A Skein
Flung colored, after Rain,
Would suit as bright,
Except that flight
Were Aliment—

"If it would last"
I asked the East,
When that Bent Stripe
Struck up my childish
Firmament—
And I, for glee,
Took Rainbows, as the common way,
And empty Skies
The Eccentricity—

And so with Lives—
And so with Butterflies—
Seen magic—through the fright
That they will cheat the sight—
And Dower latitudes far on—
Some sudden morn—
Our portion—in the fashion—
Done—


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Read poems about / on: rainbow, magic, rain, school, butterfly, sky



Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003



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