William Butler Yeats

(13 June 1865 – 28 January 1939 / County Dublin / Ireland)

In Tara's Halls - Poem by William Butler Yeats

A MAN I praise that once in Tara's Hals
Said to the woman on his knees, 'Lie still.
My hundredth year is at an end. I think
That something is about to happen, I think
That the adventure of old age begins.
To many women I have said, ''Lie still,''
And given everything a woman needs,
A roof, good clothes, passion, love perhaps,
But never asked for love; should I ask that,
I shall be old indeed.'
Thereon the man
Went to the Sacred House and stood between
The golden plough and harrow and spoke aloud
That all attendants and the casual crowd might hear.
'God I have loved, but should I ask return
Of God or woman, the time were come to die.'
He bade, his hundred and first year at end,
Diggers and carpenters make grave and coffin;
Saw that the grave was deep, the coffin sound,
Summoned the generations of his house,
Lay in the coffin, stopped his breath and died.


Comments about In Tara's Halls by William Butler Yeats

  • p.a. noushad (6/19/2008 4:18:00 AM)


    the life and the mortality which paints our life. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: woman, house, women, passion, god, time, love



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, May 15, 2001



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