William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

Lucy I - Poem by William Wordsworth

STRANGE fits of passion have I known:
   And I will dare to tell,
But in the lover's ear alone,
   What once to me befell.

When she I loved look'd every day
   Fresh as a rose in June,
I to her cottage bent my way,
   Beneath an evening moon.

Upon the moon I fix'd my eye,
All over the wide lea;
With quickening pace my horse drew nigh
Those paths so dear to me.

And now we reach'd the orchard-plot;
And, as we climb'd the hill,
The sinking moon to Lucy's cot
Came near and nearer still.

In one of those sweet dreams I slept,
Kind Nature's gentlest boon!
And all the while my eyes I kept
On the descending moon.

My horse moved on; hoof after hoof
He raised, and never stopp'd:
When down behind the cottage roof,
At once, the bright moon dropp'd.

What fond and wayward thoughts will slide
Into a lover's head!
'O mercy!' to myself I cried,
'If Lucy should be dead!'


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Read poems about / on: horse, moon, june, passion, nature, rose, alone, dream, sleep



Poem Submitted: Saturday, January 4, 2003



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