Thomas MacDonagh

(1 February 1878 - 3 May 1916 / Cloughjordan / Ireland)

May Day - Poem by Thomas MacDonagh

I wish I were to-day on the hill behind the wood,--
My eyes on the brown bog there and the Shannon river,--
Behind the wood at home, a quickened solitude
When the winds from Slieve Bloom set the branches there a-quiver.

The winds are there now and the green of May
On every feathery tree-bough, tender on every hedge:
Over the bog-fields there larks carol to-day,
And a cuckoo is mocking them out of the woodland's edge.

Here a country warmth is quiet on the rocks
That alone make never a change when the May is duly come;
Here sings no lark, and to-day no cuckoo mocks:
Over the wide hill a hawk floats, and the leaves are dumb.


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Poem Submitted: Monday, September 20, 2010



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