William Cullen Bryant

(November 3, 1794 – June 12, 1878 / Boston)

Mutation - Poem by William Cullen Bryant

They talk of short-lived pleasure--be it so--
Pain dies as quickly; stern, hard-featured pain
Expires, and lets her weary prisoner go.
The fiercest agonies have shortest reign;
And after dreams of horror, comes again
The welcome morning with its rays of peace.
Oblivion, softly wiping out the stain,
Makes the strong secret pangs of pain to cease:

Remorse is virtue's root; its fair increase
Are fruits of innocence and blessedness;
Thus joy, o'erborne and bound, doth still release
His young limbs from the chains that round him press.
Weep not that the world changes--did it keep
A stable, changeless state, 'twere cause indeed to weep.


Comments about Mutation by William Cullen Bryant

  • (12/9/2006 10:12:00 PM)


    Itz reali a gud poem u can feel it excellent job keep goin (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: innocence, pain, peace, joy, world, change, dream



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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