William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

On The Departure Of Sir Walter Scott From Abbotsford - Poem by William Wordsworth

. A trouble, not of clouds, or weeping rain,
Nor of the setting sun's pathetic light
Engendered, hangs o'er Eildon's triple height:
Spirits of Power, assembled there, complain
For kindred Power departing from their sight;
While Tweed, best pleased in chanting a blithe strain,
Saddens his voice again, and yet again.
Lift up your hearts, ye Mourners! for the might
Of the whole world's good wishes with him goes;
Blessings and prayers in nobler retinue
Than sceptred king or laurelled conqueror knows,
Follow this wondrous Potentate. Be true,
Ye winds of ocean, and the midland sea,
Wafting your Charge to soft Parthenope!


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Read poems about / on: power, ocean, rain, sea, sun, light, world, wind



Poem Submitted: Thursday, January 1, 2004



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