Percy Bysshe Shelley

(1792-1822 / Horsham / England)

Remembrance - Poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley

I.
Swifter far than summer's flight--
Swifter far than youth’s delight--
Swifter far than happy night,
Art thou come and gone--
As the earth when leaves are dead,
As the night when sleep is sped,
As the heart when joy is fled,
I am left lone, alone.

II.
The swallow summer comes again--
The owlet night resumes her reign--
But the wild-swan youth is fain
To fly with thee, false as thou.--
My heart each day desires the morrow;
Sleep itself is turned to sorrow;
Vainly would my winter borrow
Sunny leaves from any bough.

III.
Lilies for a bridal bed--
Roses for a matron’s head--
Violets for a maiden dead--
Pansies let MY flowers be:
On the living grave I bear
Scatter them without a tear--
Let no friend, however dear,
Waste one hope, one fear for me.


Comments about Remembrance by Percy Bysshe Shelley

  • Susan Williams (3/9/2016 3:01:00 PM)


    I swear magic flows through his poetry like a sparkling stream. Absolutely beautiful. I wonder though if he actually meant those last two lines. (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Thursday, April 1, 2010



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