William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

Song For The Wandering Jew - Poem by William Wordsworth

Though the torrents from their fountains
Roar down many a craggy steep,
Yet they find among the mountains
Resting-places calm and deep.

Clouds that love through air to hasten,
Ere the storm its fury stills,
Helmet-like themselves will fasten
On the heads of towering hills.

What, if through the frozen centre
Of the Alps the Chamois bound,
Yet he has a home to enter
In some nook of chosen ground:

And the Sea-horse, though the ocean
Yield him no domestic cave,
Slumbers without sense of motion,
Couched upon the rocking wave.

If on windy days the Raven
Gambol like a dancing skiff,
Not the less she loves her haven
In the bosom of the cliff.

The fleet Ostrich, till day closes,
Vagrant over desert sands,
Brooding on her eggs reposes
When chill night that care demands.

Day and night my toils redouble,
Never nearer to the goal;
Night and day, I feel the trouble
Of the Wanderer in my soul.


Comments about Song For The Wandering Jew by William Wordsworth

  • Tapan M. Saren (4/22/2017 10:45:00 AM)


    So beautiful............... (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: raven, horse, ocean, home, night, sea, song, dance



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002

Poem Edited: Monday, January 2, 2012


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