Edmund Spenser

(1552 - 13 January 1599 / London / England)

Sonnet Lxxii - Poem by Edmund Spenser

OFt when my spirit doth spred her bolder winges,
In mind to mount vp to the purest sky:
it down is weighd with thoght of earthly things:
and clogd with burden of mortality,
Where when that souerayne beauty it doth spy,
resembling heauens glory in her light:
drawne with sweet pleasures bayt, it back doth fly,
and vnto heauen forgets her former flight.
There my fraile fancy fed with full delight,
doth bath in blisse and mantleth most at ease:
ne thinks of other heauen, but how it might
her harts desire with most contentment please,
Hart need not with none other happinesse,
but here on earth to haue such heuens blisse.


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Read poems about / on: beauty, sky, light, sonnet



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002



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