Ivor Gurney

(1890-1937 / England)

Sonnet. September 1922 - Poem by Ivor Gurney

Fierce indignation is best understood by those
Who have time or no fear, or a hope in its real good
One loses it with a filed soul or in sentimental mood
Anger is gone with sunset, or flows as flows
The water in easy mill-runs; the earth that ploughs
Forgets protestation in its turning, the rood
Prepares, considers, fulfils, and the poppy's blood
Makes old the old changing of the headlands brows.

But the toad under the harrow toadiness
Is known to forget, and even the butterfly
Has doubts of wisdom when that clanking thing goes by
And's not distressed. A twisted thing keeps still
That thing easier twisted than a grocers bill
And No history of November keeps the guy.


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Poem Submitted: Tuesday, August 31, 2010



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