Mary Darby Robinson

(1758 - 1800 / England)

Sonnet To Ingratitude - Poem by Mary Darby Robinson

He that's ungrateful, has no guilt but one;
All other crimes may pass for virtues in him.
- YOUNG.


I COULD have borne affliction's sharpest thorn;
The sting of malice­poverty's deep wound;
The sneers of vulgar pride, the idiot's scorn;
Neglected Love, false Friendship's treach'rous sound;

I could, with patient smile, extract the dart
Base calumny had planted in my heart;
The fangs of envy; agonizing pain;
ALL, ALL, nor should my steady soul complain:

E'en had relentless FATE, with cruel pow'r,
Darken'd the sunshine of each youthful day;
While from my path she snatch'd each transient flow'r.
Not one soft sigh my sorrow should betray;
But where INGRATITUDE'S fell poisons pour,
HOPE shrinks subdued­and LIFE'S BEST JOYS DECAY.


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Read poems about / on: poverty, sunshine, pride, fate, sorrow, smile, hope, pain, heart, life, sonnet, joy, wind



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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