Edmund Spenser

(1552 - 13 January 1599 / London / England)

Sonnet Xxv - Poem by Edmund Spenser

HOw long shall this lyke dying lyfe endure,
And know no end of her owne mysery:
but wast and weare away in termes vnsure,
twixt feare and hope depending doubtfully.
Yet better were attonce to let me die,
and shew the last ensample of your pride:
then to torment me thus with cruelty,
to proue your powre, which I too wel haue tride.
But yet if in your hardned brest ye hide,
a close intent at last to shew me grace:
then all the woes and wrecks which I abide,
as meanes of blisse I gladly wil embrace.
And wish that more and greater they might be,
that greater meede at last may turne to mee.


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Read poems about / on: pride, hope, sonnet



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002



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