William Henry Davies

(3 July 1871 – 26 September 1940 / Monmouthshire / Wales)

The Fog - Poem by William Henry Davies

I saw the fog grow thick,
Which soon made blind my ken;
It made tall men of boys,
And giants of tall men.

It clutched my throat, I coughed;
Nothing was in my head
Except two heavy eyes
Like balls of burning lead.

And when it grew so black
That I could know no place,
I lost all judgment then,
Of distance and of space.

The street lamps, and the lights
Upon the halted cars,
Could either be on earth
Or be the heavenly stars.

A man passed by me close,
I asked my way, he said,
'Come, follow me, my friend'—
I followed where he led.

He rapped the stones in front,
'Trust me,' he said, 'and come';
I followed like a child—
A blind man led me home.

Topic(s) of this poem: fog


Comments about The Fog by William Henry Davies

  • (11/13/2017 4:15:00 AM)


    Can I get the meaing of the poem explained stanzawise (Report) Reply

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  • (11/13/2017 3:54:00 AM)


    Can I have stanzawise poem explained (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Thursday, March 5, 2015



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