Dante Gabriel Rossetti

(12 May 1828 – 9 April 1882 / London / England)

The House Of Life: 71. The Choice, I - Poem by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Eat thou and drink; to-morrow thou shalt die.
Surely the earth, that's wise being very old,
Needs not our help. Then loose me, love, and hold
Thy sultry hair up from my face; that I
May pour for thee this golden wine, brim-high,
Till round the glass thy fingers glow like gold.
We'll drown all hours: thy song, while hours are toll'd,
Shall leap, as fountains veil the changing sky.

Now kiss, and think that there are really those,
My own high-bosom'd beauty, who increase
Vain gold, vain lore, and yet might choose our way!
Through many years they toil; then on a day
They die not,--for their life was death,--but cease;
And round their narrow lips the mould falls close.


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Read poems about / on: kiss, hair, song, beauty, sky, death, house, life, change



Poem Submitted: Thursday, January 1, 2004



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