Thomas Heywood

(1575-1650)

The Message - Poem by Thomas Heywood

YE little birds that sit and sing
   Amidst the shady valleys,
And see how Phillis sweetly walks
   Within her garden-alleys;
Go, pretty birds, about her bower;
Sing, pretty birds, she may not lower;
Ah me! methinks I see her frown!
   Ye pretty wantons, warble.

Go tell her through your chirping bills,
   As you by me are bidden,
To her is only known my love,
   Which from the world is hidden.
Go, pretty birds, and tell her so,
See that your notes strain not too low,
For still methinks I see her frown;
   Ye pretty wantons, warble.

Go tune your voices' harmony
   And sing, I am her lover;
Strain loud and sweet, that every note
   With sweet content may move her:
And she that hath the sweetest voice,
Tell her I will not change my choice:
--Yet still methinks I see her frown!
   Ye pretty wantons, warble.

O fly! make haste! see, see, she falls
   Into a pretty slumber!
Sing round about her rosy bed
   That waking she may wonder:
Say to her, 'tis her lover true
That sendeth love to you, to you!
And when you hear her kind reply,
   Return with pleasant warblings.
,.

COME, Sleep, and with thy sweet deceiving
   Lock me in delight awhile;
   Let some pleasing dreams beguile
   All my fancies; that from thence
   I may feel an influence
All my powers of care bereaving!

Though but a shadow, but a sliding,
   Let me know some little joy!
   We that suffer long annoy
   Are contented with a thought
   Through an idle fancy wrought:
O let my joys have some abiding!


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Read poems about / on: change, sleep, joy, world, dream



Poem Submitted: Saturday, January 4, 2003



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