Charles Mackay

(1814-1889 / Scotland)

The Miller Of Dee - Poem by Charles Mackay

There dwelt a miller, hale and bold,
Beside the river Dee;
He worked and sang from morn till night -
No lark more blithe than he;
And this the burden of his song
Forever used to be:
'I envy nobody - no, not I -
And nobody envies me!'

'Thou'rt wrong, my friend,' said good King Hal,
'As wrong as wrong can be;
For could my heart be light as thine,
I'd gladly change with thee.
And tell me now, what makes thee sing,
With voice so loud and free,
While I am sad, though I am king,
Beside the river Dee?'

The miller smiled and doffed his cap,
'I earn my bread,' quoth he;
'I love my wife, I love my friend,
I love my children three;
I owe no penny I can not pay,
I thank the river Dee,
That turns the mill that grinds the corn
That feeds my babes and me.'

'Good friend,' said Hall, and sighed the while,
'Farewell, and happy be;
But say no more, if thou'dst be true,
That no one envies thee;
Thy mealy cap is worth my crown,
Thy mill my kingdom's fee;
Such men as thou are England's boast,
O miller of the Dee!


Comments about The Miller Of Dee by Charles Mackay

  • (11/7/2010 8:16:00 AM)


    Learned this in class 9 st.plz aizawl :) (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Friday, September 17, 2010

Poem Edited: Saturday, May 21, 2011


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