John Keats

(31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821 / London, England)

To Haydon With A Sonnet Written On Seeing The Elgin Marbles - Poem by John Keats

Haydon! forgive me that I cannot speak
Definitively of these mighty things;
Forgive me, that I have not eagle's wings,
That what I want I know not where to seek,
And think that I would not be over-meek,
In rolling out upfollowed thunderings,
Even to the steep of Heliconian springs,
Were I of ample strength for such a freak.
Think, too, that all these numbers should be thine;
Whose else? In this who touch thy vesture's hem?
For, when men stared at what was most divine
With brainless idiotism and o'erwise phlegm,
Thou hadst beheld the full Hesperian shine
Of their star in the east, and gone to worship them!

Topic(s) of this poem: sonnet

Form: Ekphrastic


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Read poems about / on: strength, star, spring



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003

Poem Edited: Thursday, January 29, 2015


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