Robert Laurence Binyon

(1869-1943 / England)

Towers Of Italy - Poem by Robert Laurence Binyon

Never were towers so fair, so bold,
Passionately springing, arrogant towers!
Nor air so blue over roofs so old,
Nor on ancient walls so rare a gold,
When I found my love among the flowers.

O mighty Spirits, never to be stilled,
Whose glorious works concluded seem,
Yet in whom is a glory unfulfilled,
And still for us you build, you build,
What have you told her out of your dream?

She comes from shadow of streets below,
And surely, O Spirits, you were there,
Pacing among the shadows; lo,
In her eyes is a light, on her face a glow,
As she comes through a golden air.

Do you feel, do you breathe and throb again
In her bosom's beat and shining eyes,--
As an old chant heavy with world--old pain
Is lifted afresh in a splendid strain
On young lips, up to the skies?

My love is fair as a voice that sings,
In a scented garden of joyous flowers.
Do the old walls keep their buried things?
Yet the air is astir as with throbbing of wings
And heaven with the springing of the towers.

The hills lift a loneliness around;
But my love has a light about her head;
And as if they uttered names renowned,
Bells from the towers to the silences resound--
Voices of the youth of the dead!


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Poem Submitted: Wednesday, September 1, 2010



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