Robert Browning

(1812-1889 / London / England)

Robert Browning Poems

81. Lost Mistress, The 12/31/2002
82. Lost Leader, The 12/31/2002
83. Guardian-Angel, The 12/31/2002
84. Home Thoughts, From The Sea 1/3/2003
85. An Epistle Containing The Strange Medical Experience Of Karshish, The Arab Physician 1/1/2004
86. Youth And Art 5/13/2001
87. A Wall 4/7/2010
88. Abt Volger 1/3/2003
89. Aix In Provence 5/13/2001
90. Cristina 5/13/2001
91. Last Ride Together, The 12/31/2002
92. "Heap Cassia, Sandal-Buds And Stripes" 12/31/2002
93. How They Brought The Good News From Ghent To Aix 5/13/2001
94. From ‘paracelsus’ 1/1/2004
95. Laboratory, The 12/31/2002
96. The Last Ride Together 5/13/2001
97. Never The Time And The Place 12/31/2002
98. Earth's Immortalities 5/13/2001
99. By The Fire-Side 5/13/2001
100. A Cavalier Song 4/7/2010
101. Pied Piper Of Hamelin, The 12/31/2002
102. One Way Of Love 5/13/2001
103. Confessions 12/31/2002
104. Boy And The Angel, The 12/31/2002
105. Love In A Life 5/13/2001
106. Epilogue 12/31/2002
107. A Toccata Of Galuppi's 5/13/2001
108. Pippa's Song 12/31/2002
109. You'Ll Love Me Yet 1/3/2003
110. Now! 12/31/2002
111. A Serenade At The Villa 5/13/2001
112. Bishop Orders His Tomb At Saint Praxed's Church, Rome, The 12/31/2002
113. Boot And Saddle 1/3/2003
114. Prospice 12/31/2002
115. The Twins 5/13/2001
116. Love Among The Ruins 5/13/2001
117. The Year's At The Spring 1/3/2003
118. Among The Rocks 1/1/2004
119. Life In A Bottle 12/31/2002
120. Soliloquy Of The Spanish Cloister 5/13/2001
Best Poem of Robert Browning

A Woman's Last Word

I.

Let's contend no more, Love,
Strive nor weep:
All be as before, Love,
---Only sleep!

II.

What so wild as words are?
I and thou
In debate, as birds are,
Hawk on bough!

III.

See the creature stalking
While we speak!
Hush and hide the talking,
Cheek on cheek!

IV.

What so false as truth is,
False to thee?
Where the serpent's tooth is
Shun the tree---

V.

Where the apple reddens
Never pry---
Lest we lose our Edens,
Eve and I.

VI.

Be a god and hold ...

Read the full of A Woman's Last Word

Italian In England, The

That second time they hunted me
From hill to plain, from shore to sea,
And Austria, hounding far and wide
Her blood-hounds thro' the country-side,
Breathed hot and instant on my trace,---
I made six days a hiding-place
Of that dry green old aqueduct
Where I and Charles, when boys, have plucked
The fire-flies from the roof above,

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