Samuel Daniel

(1562 - 1620 / England)

Samuel Daniel Poems

1. Sonnet X: O Then I Love 1/3/2003
2. Sonnet Ii: Go, Wailing Verse 1/3/2003
3. Sonnet Xxxix: Look, Delia 1/3/2003
4. Sonnet Xx: What It Is To Breathe 1/3/2003
5. Sonnet Xxi: If Beauty Thus Be Clouded 1/3/2003
6. Sonnet Lii: O Whether 1/3/2003
7. Delia: Xxxi (1592 Version): Look, Delia, How We 'steem The 1/1/2004
8. Sonnet Xxxi: Oft Do I Muse 1/3/2003
9. Sonnet Vii: O Had She Not Been Fair 1/3/2003
10. Sonnet Liii: Drawn 1/3/2003
11. Sonnet Xxix: Whilst By Her Eyes Pursu'D 1/3/2003
12. Sonnet Viii: Thou Poor Heart 1/3/2003
13. Sonnet Li: I Must Not Grieve My Love 1/3/2003
14. Sonnet Xlix: How Long 1/3/2003
15. Sonnet Xxvii: Oft And In Vain 1/3/2003
16. Sonnet V: Whilst Youth And Error 1/3/2003
17. Sonnet Iii: If So It Hap 1/3/2003
18. Sonnet Xvii: Why Should I Sing In Verse 1/3/2003
19. Sonnet Lx: Lo, Here The Impost 1/3/2003
20. Delia Xxxiii: When Men Shall Find Thy Flower, Thy Glory, Pa 1/1/2004
21. Sonnet Xlvi: Fair And Lovely Maid 1/3/2003
22. Musophilus Containing A General Defence Of All Learning (Ex 1/1/2004
23. The Civil Wars (Excerpts) 1/1/2004
24. Sonnet Xxxiv: The Star Of My Mishap 1/3/2003
25. Sonnet Xxx: Still In The Trace 1/3/2003
26. Ulysses And The Siren 1/4/2003
27. Sonnet Xl: But Love 1/3/2003
28. Beauty, Time, And Love 1/4/2003
29. Sonnet Iv: These Plaintive Verses 1/3/2003
30. Sonnet Xvi: Happy In Sleep 1/3/2003
31. Sonnet I: Unto The Boundless Ocean 1/3/2003
32. Sonnet Xxxv: And Yet I Cannot 1/3/2003
33. Sonnet Xliii: Thou Canst Not Die 1/3/2003
34. Sonnet Xv: If That A Loyal Heart 1/3/2003
35. Sonnet Xxvi: Look In My Griefs 1/3/2003
36. Sonnet Lvii: Like As The Lute 1/3/2003
37. Sonnet Xxxiii: My Cares Draw 1/3/2003
38. Delia Xlv: Care-Charmer Sleep, Son Of The Sable Night 1/1/2004
39. Delia Xlvi: Let Others Sing Of Knights And Paladines 1/1/2004
40. Sonnet Xlii: When Winter Snows 1/3/2003

Comments about Samuel Daniel

  • Razan Tamimi (9/7/2013 2:53:00 AM)

    (Does any body can help me in this poem? it is for Samuel Daniel :)
    O blessed letters,1 that combine in one
    All ages past, and make one live with all;
    By you we do confer with who are gone,
    And the dead-living unto counsel call;
    By you the unborn shall have communion
    Of what we feel, and what doth us befall.
    Soul of the world, Knowledge, without thee,
    What hath the earth that truly glorious is?
    Why should our pride make such a stir to be,
    To be forgot? What good is like to this,
    To do worthy the writing, and to write
    Worthy the reading, and the world’s delight?

    4 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • Razan Tamimi (9/7/2013 2:52:00 AM)

    O blessed letters,1 that combine in one
    All ages past, and make one live with all;
    By you we do confer with who are gone,
    And the dead-living unto counsel call;
    By you the unborn shall have communion
    Of what we feel, and what doth us befall.
    Soul of the world, Knowledge, without thee,
    What hath the earth that truly glorious is?
    Why should our pride make such a stir to be,
    To be forgot? What good is like to this,
    To do worthy the writing, and to write
    Worthy the reading, and the world’s delight?


    Does any body can help me in this poem? it is for Samuel Daniel :)

  • Babyjoram Benson (5/18/2009 5:50:00 AM)

    Hello
    (favorfrank35@yahoo.co.uk)
    My name is Miss favor am 24yr old. I saw your profile today at www.youlog.com
    and it really acttract me alot i believe that you are the man i
    have been looking for to share my love; How is your health? i hope all is well
    with you. I believe that we can move from here; but remember that distance; age
    and colour dose not matter what matters is the true love and understanding; in
    my next
    e-mail i shall include my pictuer; i been waithing for your reply mail
    me with this mail address for further introduction.
    Bye hopeing to hear from you soonest

    (favorfrank35@yahoo.co.uk)

Best Poem of Samuel Daniel

Sonnet Ii: Go, Wailing Verse

Go, wailing verse, the infants of my love,
Minerva-like, brought forth without a Mother:
Present the image of the cares I prove;
Witness your Father's grief exceeds all other.
Sigh out a story of her cruel deeds,
With interrupted accents of despair:
A monument that whosoever reads
May justly praise, and blame my loveless Fair.
Say her disdain hath dried up my blood,
And starved you, in succours still denying;
Press to her eyes, importune me some good;
Waken her sleeping pity with your crying.
Knock at that hard heart, beg till you have mov'd her,...

Read the full of Sonnet Ii: Go, Wailing Verse

Sonnet Lii: O Whether

At the Author's Going into Italy

O whether (poor forsaken) wilt thou go,
To go from sorrow and thine own distress,
When every place presents the face of woe,
And no remove can make thy sorrow less?
Yet go (forsaken), leave these woods, these plains;
Leave her and all, and all for her that leaves
Thee and thy love forlorn, and both disdains,

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