Thomas Osborne Davis

Rating: 4.33
Rating: 4.33

Thomas Osborne Davis Poems

I.

She is a rich and rare land;
Oh! she's a fresh and fair land;
...

Come in the evening, or come in the morning;
Come when you ’re look’d for, or come without warning:
...

I

The Geraldines! The Geraldines! - 'tis full a thousand years
Since, 'mid the Tuscan vineyards, bright flashed their
...

AIR--_An Cota Caol._
I.
His kiss is sweet, his word is kind,
His love is rich to me
...

I.

Thrice, at the huts of Fontenoy, the English column failed,
And twice the lines of Saint Antoine the Dutch in vain
...

I.

We hate the Saxon and the Dane,
We hate the Norman men--
...

I.

A Nation's voice, a nation's voice--
It is a solemn thing!
...

I.

How soft is the moon on Glengariff,
The rocks seem to melt with the light:
...

I.

In Bodenstown Churchyard there is a green grave,
And wildly along it the winter winds rave;
...

AIR--_The Brink of the White Rocks._
I.
When all beside a vigil keep,
The West's asleep, the West's asleep--
...

I.

Let Britain boast her British hosts,
About them all right little care we;
...

There flows from her spirit such love and delight,
That the face of Blind Mary is radiant with light--
...

The tribune's tongue and poet's pen
May sow the seed in prostrate men;
But 'tis the soldier's sword alone
...

“DID they dare, did they dare, to slay Eoghan Ruadh O’Neill?”
...

THE mess-tent is full, and the glasses are set,
And the gallant Count Thomond is president yet;
The vet’ran arose, like an uplifted lance,
...

I.

The summer sun is falling soft on Carbery's hundred isles--
The summer sun is gleaming still through Gabriel's rough
...

Oh! the marriage, the marriage,
With love and _mo bhuachaill_ for me,
The ladies that ride in a carriage
...

Shall they bury me in the deep,
Where wind-forgetting waters sleep?
Shall they dig a grave for me,
Under the green-wood tree?
...

Ireland! rejoice, and England! deplore--
Faction and feud are passing away.
...

I.

Let the coward shrink aside,
We'll have our own again;
...

Thomas Osborne Davis Biography

Thomas Osborne Davis was a revolutionary Irish writer who was the chief organizer and poet of the Young Ireland movement. Thomas Davis was born in the town of Mallow in the county of Cork, the son of a Welsh father, a surgeon in the Royal Artillery, and an Irish mother. His father died one month after his birth and his mother moved to Warrington Place near Mount Street bridge in Dublin. In 1830, they moved to 67 Lower Baggot Street. He attended school in Lower Mount Street before studying in Trinity College, Dublin. He graduated in Law and received an Arts degree in 1836, precursory to his being called to the Irish Bar in 1838. He established The Nation newspaper with Charles Gavan Duffy and John Blake Dillon. He dedicated his life to Irish nationalism. He wrote some stirring nationalistic ballads, originally contributed to The Nation, and afterwards republished as Spirit of the Nation, as well as a memoir of Curran, the Irish lawyer and orator, prefixed to an edition of his speeches; and he had formed many literary plans which were brought to naught by his death, from tuberculosis, in 1845 at the age of 30. He is buried in Mount Jerome Cemetery, Dublin. He himself was a Protestant, but preached unity between Catholics and Protestants. To Davis, it was not blood that made you Irish, but the willingness to be part of the Irish nation. Although the Saxon and Dane were, Davis asserted, objects of unpopularity, their descendants would be Irish if they simply allowed themselves to be. He was to the fore of Irish nationalist thinking and it has been noted by later nationalist heroes, such as Padraig Pearse, that while Wolfe Tone laid out the basic premise that Ireland as a nation must be free, Davis was the one who built this idea up promoting the Irish identity. He is the author of the famous Irish rebel song A Nation Once Again. He also wrote the Lament for Owen Roe O'Neill. A statue of Davis, created by Edward Delaney, was unveiled on College Green, Dublin, in 1966, attended by the Irish president, Eamon de Valera. One of the secondary schools in Davis' home town of Mallow, Davis College, is named after him. A number of GAA clubs around the country are also named after him; including the one based in Tallaght, Dublin and the one based in Corrinshego.)

The Best Poem Of Thomas Osborne Davis

My Land

I.

She is a rich and rare land;
Oh! she's a fresh and fair land;
She is a dear and rare land--
This native land of mine.


II.

No men than her's are braver--
Her women's hearts ne'er waver;
I'd freely die to save her,
And think my lot divine.


III.

She's not a dull or cold land;
No! she's a warm and bold land;
Oh! she's a true and old land--
This native land of mine.


IV.

Could beauty ever guard her,
And virtue still reward her,
No foe would cross her border--
No friend within it pine!


V.

Oh! she's a fresh and fair land;
Oh! she's a true and rare land;
Yes! she's a rare and fair land--
This native land of mine.

Thomas Osborne Davis Comments

John stack 25 August 2021

I love the geraldines. Fitzgeralds are ancestors of Stacks.

0 0 Reply
EAMON MAC DONNELL. 13 December 2017

GREAT SONG OF FREEDOM BY THOMAS DAVIS EXCELLENT VERSION OF THIS SONG BY JOHNNY MC EVOY..

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