poet Thylias Moss

Thylias Moss

Thylias Moss
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Thylias Moss (born February 27, 1954 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American poet, writer, experimental filmmaker, sound artist and playwright, of African American, Indian, and European heritage, who has published a number of poetry collections, children’s books, essays, and multimedia work she calls poam s, products of acts of making, related to her work in Limited Fork Theory. Among her awards are a MacArthur Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Artist's Fellowship from the Massachusetts Arts Council, an NEA grant, and the Witter Bynner Poetry Prize Witter Bynner award for poetry.

Moss was born Thylias Rebecca Brasier, in a working-class family in Ohio. Her Native American father ... more »

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Thylias Moss Quotations

  • ''The writer in me can look as far as an African-American woman and stop. Often that writer looks through the African-American woman. Race is a layer of being, but not a culmination.''
    Thylias Moss, African American poet. As quoted in the Wall Street Journal (May 12, 1994).
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  • ''Anger becomes limiting, restricting. You can't see through it. While anger is there, look at that, too. But after a while, you have to look at something else.''
    Thylias Moss, African American poet. As quoted in the Wall Street Journal (May 12, 1994).
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  • ''One must always be aware, to notice—even though the cost of noticing is to become responsible.''
    Thylias Moss, African American poet. As quoted in the Wall Street Journal (May 12, 1994).
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Best Poem of Thylias Moss

Interpretation of a Poem by Frost

A young black girl stopped by the woods,
so young she knew only one man: Jim Crow
but she wasn't allowed to call him Mister.
The woods were his and she respected his boundaries
even in the absence of fence.
Of course she delighted in the filling up
of his woods, she so accustomed to emptiness,
to being taken at face value.
This face, her face eternally the brown
of declining autumn, watches snow inter the grass,
cling to bark making it seem indecisive
about race preference, a fast-to-melt idealism.
With the grass covered, black and white are the ...

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